Robynne Anderson's Emerging Thoughts on Ag

From Pulse Feast day to feast pulses all year!

These last weeks at Emerging Ag have been tremendously exciting thanks to the buzz created by Pulse Feast. Months of hard work and great collaborations between all the IYP2016 partners made January 6th a remarkable starting point for the International Year of Pulses.

From Canada to France, through Mexico, the US, UK and Mauritania, the Emerging team was mobilised to make Pulse Feast a day to remember.

A few numbers to give you a glimpse of the tremendous success? 141 events in 36 countries! And, thanks to Thunderclap we had the #PulseFeast tag trending all over social media platforms with 21 million posts!

The Emerging Ag team worked around the clock for 5 days to insure a dynamic and live update of the Pulse Feast events. A quick glance at our coverage shows that all the continents were on board for Pulse Feast:

Oceania – 9 events:  Australia (7), New Zealand (2)

Asia – 12 events: China (2), India (5), Japan, Malaysia, Taiwan, Thailand, Singapore

Near East – 6 events: Bahrain, UAE, Lebanon, Turkey (3 events)

Europe – 14 events:  Belgium, France (2), Germany, Netherlands (2), Spain, Sweden, Russia, UK (6)

Africa – 7 events:  Kenya, Malawi, Mauritania, Morocco, South Africa (3)

North America – 49 events:  Canada (33), USA (19)

Latin America and Caribbean – 8 events:  Argentina, Colombia, Brazil, Peru (2), Cuba, Mexico (2), Cayman Islands, Dominican Republic

Pulse Feast had been a great beginning of what is going to be a key year to make a global difference in the pulse value chain. In that regard, in order to promote the global production and consumption of pulses around the world, the International Year of Pulses will tackle key challenges through numerous signature events during the year.

The next events in line are already scheduled for February:
The Pulse Conclave in India will promote the global pulses trade and industry
The PanAfrican Grain Legume and World Cowpea Conference in Zambia

We hope that all these efforts from all the key stakeholders of the pulse industry, small farmers or bigger producers will contribute to make a difference in a global effort to fight hunger and enhance the quality of nutrition around the world.

 

 

 

Pulse Feast Thunderclap – We Need Your Support

PulseFeast2

Tomorrow is a big day for us.  On January 6th we have a global thunderclap to promote Pulse Feasts around the world. Thunderclap is an app that allows organisations and their supporters to share messages on social media (Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr) automatically.  If you sign up, the Thunderclap will automatically post a #PulseFeast message around the world at 12pm GMT on 6th January. Please sign up using your own Twitter or Facebook profile and encourage your network to do so.  It is very simple and the link is here: bit.ly/1S0C1NH

There are more than 50 events planned around the world starting in New Zealand and moving all the way to the West Coast.  We can’t wait and the Emerging team will be working around the clock starting on January 5th at 11pm our time.  Visit www.pulses.org to see it all unfold.

International Migrants Day

According to the UN Population Division (DESA) estimates, the number of international migrants — persons living in a country other than where they were born — reached 244 million in 2015 for the world as a whole, an increase of 71 million, or 41 per cent, compared to 2000. The year 2015 will be remembered as one of migrant tragedies. But 2015 will also be remembered  as the year in which the international community recognized the contributions of migrants, migration and mobility to countries of origin, destination and transit by integrating international migration in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. We at Emerging wish a world of freedom, food security and personal security to all those making their way to new homes.

– Secretary-General’s Message for 2015 (see: http://www.un.org/en/events/migrantsday/2015/sgmessage.shtml)

CCAFS at COP21: Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security

With the CGIAR system facing ridiculous cutbacks, and climate change looming large, there couldn’t be a more important time to focus on the great work of the Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security Research Program led by Bruce Campbell.

What will the Paris climate talks deliver for food and farming? It’s a critical question, as the climate change agreement in Paris is not likely to address agriculture explicitly. Yet a new agreement can open the door to action on food security and agriculture. We are optimistic and see several ways forward beyond Paris. Read more in our brief analysis of Progress on Agriculture under the UN Climate Talks.

The good news is that countries are leading the way by including action on agriculture in their Intended Nationally Determined Commitments (INDCs). Our new analysis finds a vast majority of country-level climate plans prioritise agriculture, despite sector’s slow progress at UN negotiations. Read the press release and download the brief.

We’re also optimistic about some of the initiatives that will be launched under the Lima-Paris Action Agenda on 1 December (Agriculture Action Day) including the 4/1000 initiative to restore soils and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development.

Other key events at COP21 include Farmers Day  (2 December) and the Global Landscapes Forum (5-6 December). See the full list below. If you’re not in Paris you can follow our blogTwitterLinkedIn or Facebook for updates. We look forward to good discussions so we can work together on implementing sustainable solutions.

Regards,

Bruce Campbell
CCAFS Program Director

COP21: It’s Time to Eat for the Planet

With the world’s leaders gathering in Paris to discuss how collective efforts can ensure that global warming does not rise above two degrees, farmers face the double challenge of how to feed a booming global population set to reach 9bn, while delivering a more sustainable agricultural system.

Though it may not always be prominent in the COP21 discussions, the critical role played by agriculture in many economies — in terms of food security, economic opportunity and poverty reduction — means agriculture is a key component of many national strategies for adaptation and mitigation.

The importance of COP21 to sustainable agriculture will be huge. Not least, because in developing countries, it will be small-scale farmers and farming families, who will be on the frontline battling rising temperatures, frequent droughts and food supply shortages across the globe triggered by climate change.

Faced with the complexities of climate change, science and politics, it is all too easy to turn away and carry on regardless — especially, if you are lucky enough to live in the richer, developed world.

So, how can each of us tackle climate change?

My suggestion is review your diet. It’s time to eat for the planet. What we eat sends a signal to the supply chain and helps create a more sustainable and healthier future for the world’s people and the planet.

One food source which bridges being both healthy for people and the planet arepulses. These are likely to come to the fore with Government, policy makers and consumers next year.

The UN has declared 2016 the International Year of Pulses (IYP) because ‘Pulses are a vital source of plant-based proteins and amino acids for people around the globe and should be eaten as part of a healthy diet to address obesity, as well as to prevent and help manage chronic diseases such as diabetes, coronary conditions and cancer’.

The UN also notes pulses, such as chickpeas, peas, beans and lentils, have nitrogen-fixing properties which can contribute to increasing soil fertility and have a positive impact on the environment’.

Pulses have a number of other environmental positives: they use less water than other protein sources, less fertilizer and have a low carbon footprint. New more resilient strains of pulse seed, like the white gold bean, which has been so successful in Ethiopia, have been developed to help farmers fight the impact of climate change.

Strategically, they are important to food security and nutrition agenda. Professor Mywish Maredia of Michigan State University has argued that pulses are “uniquely positioned” as a commodity group to tackle the many competing challenges facing the developing world, including adequate nutrition and health and also addressing environmental resource constraints and access issues.

In a world where 800m people are malnourished, pulses are nutrition dense and affordable foods, which are already part of many governments’ food nutrition and security policies.

Unfortunately, despite their many widely acknowledged nutritional and environmental benefits of pulses, global consumption and production is not as high as it might be. Solving one of these things part is in the gift of each of us. So, if you want to play a (small) part in the Paris Convention, try eating your pulses, starting perhaps with the typically French Puy lentils in solidarity with France.

More recipes: http://www.pulses.org/recipes/

Read this post on Huffington Post Green.