Robynne Anderson's Emerging Thoughts on Ag

Farmers Being Heard

Young farmers are moving agriculture ahead, and it is privilege to get to interact with them. One bright light is Karol Kissane of Ireland, a Nuffield scholar. The Nuffield programme really does have an eye for talent and selects future leaders for a year of intensive engagement globally. Karol has just finished his scholarship year and here is a fun video where he provides some feedback on the adventures he had: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aU5OOJVACDY

One of the highlights he cites is the chance to speak in plenary at the UN Committee on Food Security during a discussion on the Decade of Family Farming. What could be more important than having farmers be heard during such a decade. In that speech Karol stated “Today many people have referred to family farming as the backbone of the economy in many developing countries, but also those who are suffering the most. Let’s help all family farmers improve their livelihoods, build value chains and on-farm processing, and use innovation to improve the sustainability of their farms.”

There is also a great series out by Farming First with famers talking about the effects of climate change on them, but also the measures they are taking to tackle carbon emissions. No one is better placed to grow more crops, manage soils, plant more trees or sync more carbon than farmers. The potential to move to zero carbon farming relies on technologies and innovative practices that will have agriculture play its part to hit 1.5: https://www.un.org/en/climatechange/un-climate-summit-2019.shtml

Digital Agriculture: A Savior for Agriculture Overall

Around the world, the agriculture sector is currently in the throes of a momentous shift. Consumers are demanding changes in the food system; labeling and traceability demands are surging; and more environmentally sound practices are expected. Digital agriculture can be seen as the savior to many of the pressures agriculture faces.

As the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) has highlighted in its latest Global Assessment, changes are needed at many different levels of global food production system to reduce hunger and poverty, improve public health, and reverse ongoing biodiversity losses.

The article continues to discuss the developments and advancements that digital agriculture could provide in achieving a more efficient and sustainable agriculture system. You can read the full article, written by Emerging ag President Robynne Anderson, published in Startup City here.

A Crop Whose Time has Come

This article was originally posted in the IPGA Pulse India magazine. Download the magazine here

Pulses have never been so relevant. Celebrated in the EAT-Lancet report and the newly declared World Pulses Day – peas, lentils, chickpeas and other pulses are riding a wave of growing attention.  For India, pulses are a timeless part of the diet, but in many other countries, pulses are part of a growing trend to focus on plant-based proteins.

What we eat sends a signal to the supply chain and the signal is about pulses as a sustainable part of the food basket.  While the discussion of meat lately has not fairly reflected the disparity in developed and developing countries, certainly pulses are part of a more sustainable and healthier future.  Read More

The Legacy of Pulses: #WorldPulsesDay

Thanks to the formidable leadership of Burkina Faso, the Second Committee of the 73rd Session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) adopted, by consensus, in November 2018 a draft resolution establishing 10 February as World Pulses Day (WPD). The establishment of this day will be a lasting legacy of the enormously successful 2016 International Year of Pulses. World Pulses Day is a new opportunity to heighten public awareness of the nutritional benefits of eating pulses! Read the UN General Assembly (UNGA) resolution here. World Pulses Day is meant to also reaffirm the contribution of pulses for sustainable agriculture and achieving the 2030 Agenda. Read More

2018 in Review

Happy Holidays!

As 2018 comes to a close, here is a short selection of some of our proudest accomplishments of the past year.

January

The Outreach Network for Gene Drive Research launched

The Outreach Network for Gene Drive Research was created and launched this year with Emerging as its Secretariat. The network supports coordination among members, information sharing, and engagement with key stakeholders, in order to raise awareness of the value of gene drive research for the public good and of the need for continuous efforts in its advancement. Their work this year focused on engagement in the policy process for the Convention for Biological Diversity, which met for the 14th Conference of the Parties (COP14) in Egypt in November. An open letter was published ahead of the convention to discuss how research on gene drive technology can benefit environmental conservation and public health goals. Take a look at their website for more information on the work they do.

Target Malaria develops new resources

Our collaboration with the Target Malaria project is growing strong and we’re excited to be helping a group tackling such an important issue. This year we’ve supported the creation of new communication tools that support learning and understanding of the project. These include; development of infographics, factsheets, as well as a series of videos, such as one made to describe the mark, release and recapture process as it collects information on mosquito vectors in Burkina Faso.

Emerging Team Retreat

The Emerging team gathered in Calgary, Alberta, for their annual winter team retreat. Together we were able to review our work, and had time to enjoy the Canadian snow!

February

World Pulses Day

On behalf of the Global Pulse Confederation (GPC), Emerging has been advocating for the establishment of World Pulses Day. Burkina Faso has taken the leadership in advocating for Wold Pulses Day. The government hosted a celebration on February 10, 2018 in Ouagadougou and around the country. Since then, the Second Committee of the 73rd Session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) adopted, by consensus, in November 2018 a draft resolution establishing 10 February as World Pulses Day (WPD). The establishment of this day will be a lasting legacy of the enormously successful 2016 International Year of Pulses. The draft resolution should soon be endorsed by the Plenary of the UN General Assembly making the WPD a Day to be observed and celebrated internationally. Learn more here. Read More

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